July 2009


Dear Nathan,

I’m sorry to hear you didn’t get the part. That would have rocked. Don’t worry about me though. I’ll be happy to see Ryan Reynolds play Green Lantern, especially since it means it won’t be interfering with you playing Castle.

♥Christa

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(Thanks, Hollywoodstreams, for the video.)

Between getting firing, job hunting, getting hired, training, adjusting to my new job, and the general tunnel vision I’ve had for New Moon, July somehow snuck up on me. My friend asked last week if Harry Potter comes out this week or next. I must have looked at him so strangely. I thought, “He’s crazy! It doesn’t come out until…Merlin’s Pants! It’s July 1st!” I saw the latest trailer in the theater. I still have such high hopes. It really looks like it will be spectacular.

Have you heard of this? As it turns out I’ve had a number of work boyfriends, and I find that it helps me go to work with a more positive attitude. What do you think about this whole thing? Have you had any experience with it yourself, good or bad? Discuss.

 

Platonic work flirting: Good for business?

  • Story Highlights
  • Professor: Having a “work spouse” can be a good thing
  • Says it’s an esteem booster, makes them happy to come to work
  • Questions to ask to make sure flirting doesn’t cross the line

By Jocelyn Voo

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(LifeWire) — They ate lunch together almost every day. They commiserated over professional and personal woes, and when projects ran long at the San Francisco architecture firm where they were both summer interns, they checked building plans together until they were sprung from the office at 10 p.m.

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Take care that a flirtation with a co-worker doesn’t cross the line.

“She was fun to hang out with, and sometimes she would do things that some might consider flirty, like run a hand through my hair to mess it up,” says Hayes Shair, now 25. “Sometimes I’d sort of flirt back.”

But Shair was dating his college sweetheart at the time. This woman was more like his “work girlfriend” — a coworker with whom one flirts platonically during office hours but without any romantic intentions.

It’s hardly a unique situation. The career information Web site Vault.com reports that in a 2007 office-romance survey of 575 employees, 23 percent said they had a “work husband” or a “work wife.”

(more…)

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